Elijah Wood attends a freaky family reunion in COME TO DADDY [review]

Commentary, Film and Television

In the opening scenes of Ant Timpson’s Come to Daddy, former Lord of the Rings star Elijah Wood is once again on a quest.

When we first see him, he’s travelling on foot along a desolate shore, his baggy garments resembling a cloak, on the way to meet his estranged father who’s reached out inexplicably after a decades-long absence. The scene has a certain dreamlike quality, which seems comparatively normal as the film descends wholeheartedly into insanity.

Harley Quinn lets loose in BIRDS OF PREY [review]

Commentary, Film and Television

Cathy Yan’s Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) finds our anti-hero finally freed (quite against her will, I might add) from a life-defining toxic relationship; it also sees the character released from the constraints of Suicide Squad.

Don’t believe the reviews: THE TURNING is worth a watch. [review]

Commentary, Film and Television

If you believe the reviews, The Turning is a turn-off.

Audiences and critics seem to be united on that. The ghost story earned an “F” rating on CinemaScore. One writer for the Irish Times claimed that the film was such a “waste of time,” readers shouldn’t even bother to skim his review.

I’m not going to say these people are wrong, just that it would be a mistake to listen to them. While not perfect, The Turning is visually striking, well-acted, consistently scary and surprisingly potent, with a palpable sense of menace building throughout.

FORD V FERRARI is a deeply human car movie [review]

Commentary, Film and Television

The thing about Ford v Ferrari is that Ferrari isn’t really the villain.

James Mangold’s film chronicles the Ford Motor Company’s efforts to bolster their public image by beating Ferrari at the gruelling twenty-four hour Le Mans race. But by the time unpredictable driver Ken Miles faces off against the Italian carmaker, we’re just satisfied that he’s prevailed over his naysayers at Ford.

Waititi juxtaposes innocence with evil in JOJO RABBIT [review]

Commentary, Film and Television

The posters for Taika Waititi’s Jojo Rabbit describe it as “an anti-hate satire,” which seems like a pre-emptive reassurance to anyone caught off-guard by its jarring opening scene: a nervous ten-year-old boy anxiously preparing for his first day at a Hitler Youth camp.